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Pothos and Philodendron Plant Care Guide

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Pothos and Philodendrons Care Guide

First of all, at one point in your life, you are destined to obtain either a Pothos or a Philodendron plant. Either gifted or bought, you will own one.

So, what do you do with your Pothos and Philodendrons? How do you take care of them? What variety of them do you have? What does it need to grow, survive, and thrive?

Today we’re going to go over all of that, so keep on reading. We’ll start with what kind of Pothos and Philodendron do you own?

Get ready for a good read today, because we’re going over pretty much everything you need to know about growing your Pothos and Philodendrons!

Just before we get started I have a huge favor to ask; we really put in a lot of time and effort studying up our facts for you, and as a result, we help provide meaningful and imformative posts for you. So, it would mean the world to us if you could pin this post to your boards! Follow our Pinterest for daily tips and inspiration!

Pothos Varieties

Golden Pothos

Golden Pothos

Jessenia Pothos

Jessenia Pothos

Pearls and Jade Pothos

Pearls and Jade Pothos

Marble Queen Pothos

Marble Queen Pothos

Neon Pothos

Neon Pothos

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Manjula Pothos

Manjula Pothos

Satin Pothos

Satin Pothos

Glacier Pothos

Glacier Pothos

Jade Pothos

Pothos and Philodendrons Care Guide

Philodendron Varieties

Brandi Philodendron

Brandi Philodendron

Brasil Philodendron

Brasil Philodendron

Green Congo Philodendron


Green Heartleaf Philodendron

Green Heartleaf Philodendron

Mini Split-Leaf Philodendron

Mini Split-Leaf Philodendron

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Moonlight Philodendron


Philodendron Grazielae

Philodendron Grazielae

Prince of Orange Philodendron

Prince of Orange Philodendron

Selloum Philodendron


Xanadu Philodendron


Furthermore, it should also be noted that there are hundreds of variegations of both Pothos and Philodendrons, I included only 10 of each because they are the most likely ones that you may have.

We’re halfway through today’s article, so if you haven’t yet; it would mean the world to us if you could pin this post to your boards! Follow our Pinterest for daily tips and inspiration!

Now that you have identified what variegation you possess, how do you take care of them?

Read also:

Pothos and Philodendron Care

Although Pothos and Philodendrons are different plant species from completely different families, they do share a lot of the same needs for care.

Light

Both Pothos and Philodendrons prefer bright, but indirect sunlight. Placing your plants in direct sun can cause their leaves to brown or burn, which you don’t want of course. Both can also tolerate low light areas, but if you want to see some serious growth, then put them where they can receive lots of indirect sunlight.

Water

First of all, this goes without saying that for many houseplants, and I’m sure you’ve heard it before; the common killer for many houseplants is loving them too much and giving them too much water. There’s really no set schedule for when to water them, you have to tell by how damp their soil is.

So, stick your finger at least 2 inches into their soil, if you feel moisture, leave them alone. If the soil is dry, then water the plants thoroughly until water is dripping from the drainage hole of the pot (and make sure it completely finishes dripping, or else you put your plant at risk of getting root rot).

Also, a trick I learned (maybe not a trick, just something I’ve caught on to), is that the smaller pot you have your plant living in, then the more likely you will need to water it. Simply because smaller pots can’t retain as much soil, which can’t retain as much water.

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Propagation

I propagate every single plant I own. Propagating is the easiest way to obtain a very large number of plants for free. Who doesn’t love free plants? Therefore you get an unlimited supply of free plants, from buying only one.

Typically, I propagate my plants once their vines start getting a little out of control or messy.

But just how do you propagate Pothos and Philodendrons though? It is extremely easy honestly. It’s the same technique for both plants which makes it even easier to learn.

What you’ll need to start propagating:

  1. Good pair of pruning shears
  2. Mason jars to hold cuttings
  3. Rooting hormone to boost growth rate for roots

The steps to a successful Pothos and Philodendron propagation:

  1. First of all, it is vitally important that you use sterile shears or scissors to cut stems from your plants. As a result, you can potentially introduce infection to plants by not sterilizing. So, how do you sterilize shears? Soak them into a disinfectant, rinse off with water, and dry with a clean towel.
  2. Next, cut beneath the node of the stem. The node is essentially where the leaf starts shooting out of the main stem. Most note-worthy, you will want to cut just under about 1-2 inches.
  3. After you have your cuttings, you can then either stick them in a jar of water or damp soil for them to begin growing roots. Also, I personally always put them into the water because I can see the roots growing and I know when to pull them to plant to soil.
  4. Finally, in 3-4 weeks of your cuttings in water or soil, you should expect to see roots formed on them. If you root them in water as I do, wait until the roots are at least 2 inches long before you pull them to plant them into the soil.

And wallah! You have a completely new plant!

So, I especially love propagating my Pothos and Philodendrons because of how simple it is and how quick of growers they are once rooted. Above all, once you have a lush new plant, you can gift it to a friend! (in turn, they come to this article because they’ve somehow obtained one of these as I mentioned earlier).

Pothos and Philodendron Pests

With the proper care and attention, you shouldn’t have to worry about dealing with pests and bugs on your plants all that often, but, people are human and sometimes it’s just out of our control.

Some pests to watch out for on your plants include: mealybugs, scales, spider mites, and aphids. The best way to deal with them is taking steps to prevent them before they even get to your plants.

But if you’re reading this because you already have them and need to deal with them ASAP, then here’s what I do with my plants to keep them happy:

  1. When you come around to repotting plants into new soil, check the roots of the plants to make sure you aren’t bringing any new critters with it into its new home.
  2. If you have mealybugs or fungus gnats in your soil, what I do is pour a mix of 1 part hydrogen peroxide & 2 part water into my soil and completely rinse it thoroughly, this not only kills the bugs inside but it provides good nutrients to your plant’s roots that they will be very happy about having.
  3. Next, to deal with fungus gnats, I try to dry out the soil in my plants for as long as they will withstand to help kill any larvae lingering in the soil. (also, I’ve heard that nematodes do a wonderful job with eliminating them and bacteria in the soil, but don’t put them in there if you’ve already done the hydrogen peroxide method!)
  4. And finally, I like to wipe down all of the leaves on my bigger plants with a soap and water washcloth, as a result, that not only opens the pores on the leaves to allow them to photosynthesize but kills any bacteria lingering on them.

Furthermore, I personally try to avoid using any sort of name brand insecticide just because I’m extremely worried that my plants might react harshly to it, so, to the best of my ability, I stick to home-brewed options that I know what is in it that I’m giving to my plants.

And there you have it, friends! Happy growing!

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Pothos and Philodendrons Care Guide

Well, that is about all we have for you today. If you have any unanswered questions, please comment them below! We will tell you everything you need to know about your Pothos and Philodendron!

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